Why Aren't We Picketing Child Abuse?

by Bleeding Heart USA
(Pennsylvania, USA)

Where are all the picket lines for abused girls and boys?

Where are all the picket lines for abused girls and boys?

Let's start this off by saying I was abused as a child myself. I wasn't as adversely affected by it as much as some other girls. I'm saying that, as an adult and mother of three, I'm very aware of the fact that I was. I take all precautions to keep my children safe.


My reasons for writing in this site is, as I drove down the street in the town that I live in, I came upon a group of people protesting abortion. For me, abortion is an opinion. It may be wrong, but I'm not in any place to deny or judge someone for their right to choice. My problem is where are all the signs, all the picketers, all the voices for the children in the world? Where are all the donations from big businesses and average people, like they did for 911, Hurricane Katrina, etc.?

My heart and soul ache for everything that I can't do or help. It's an epidemic. Someone, (I wish it could be me) needs to hear the cries of the children. We need to protest the same way they do Abortion, War, Politics, Save the Planet. The way PETA protests. So that someday it can end.

I hope someone hears me out there. I hope that maybe I can affect someone. We need to listen to our children.

Thanks for listening.

Comments for Why Aren't We Picketing Child Abuse?

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Oct 13, 2007
Awareness is paramount to fighting child abuse
by: Darlene Barriere

There are agencies and groups that protest child abuse and peacefully march in order to raise awareness of the epidemic that is child abuse. Unfortunately, most focus their efforts primarily during a recognized and acknowledged month, such as in May in the United States, declared Child Abuse Prevention Month. When pickets do go up, or when a community does speak out against child abuse, they are generally in response to a tragic case, one that has often ended in the child's death. Such was evident in New Zealand this past summer after three-year-old Nia Glassie died after being subjected to months of torture-like abuse; it was all too little too late.

As a society, we tend to be more reactive than proactive. But if we have any hope of even making a slight dent in the fight against child abuse, we must be proactive. We must listen to our children. We must teach parents healthy and effective forms of discipline. We must have a curriculum in the schools that teach appropriate parenting skills and life skills in order to ensure these students become effective parents and productive members of society. Attitudes must change in order to ensure that society views children as deserving of respect and dignity.

But, programs such as these require funding. I too would love to see corporations dedicating funds for such worthwhile programs. After all, it's in their best interest to have healthy, well-adjusted individuals who will eventually make their way into the workplace. The very workplace these corporations have a vested interest in.

Darlene Barriere
Violence & Abuse Prevention Educator
Author: On My Own Terms, A Memoir

Oct 13, 2007
I couldn't agree more
by: JWC

Yes, more needs to be done to raise awareness about child abuse. Big business would find it in their own best interest to contribute to child abuse awareness. It would lead to less employee absences and increased productivity, and therefore, a happier workplace. A happier workplace leads to less stress at home, which in turn leads to a happier child.

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